Wednesday, 25 May, 2022

Understanding Nepal’s Wildlife


 

Because of the variety of flora and wildlife that occupy its territories – from the tropical Terai jungle to the snow-capped alpine environment – Nepal has earned the title “Amazon of Asia.” not just because of its gorgeous aquatic animals – get LED Aquarium Lights here. Hunting, on the other hand, endangered the extinction of some of its species fifty years ago.

Nepal has received worldwide recognition in recent years for its conservation efforts, particularly in the battle against the illicit wildlife trafficking of endangered larger one-horned rhinos, red pandas, and Bengal tigers.

Here are five facts about wildlife and conservation that have helped Nepal become a conservation leader all through world.

 

1) WILDLIFE IN NEPAL CAN RANGE ACROSS TEN NATIONAL PARKS.

 

Nepal has designated 20% of its territory as protected areas, indicating the country’s commitment to wildlife. In contrast, India, Nepal’s neighbor, has set aside 5% of its land for wildlife sanctuaries and national parks.

 

2) THE NUMBER OF BENGAL TIGERS IN NEPAL IS SET TO DOUBLE.

The endangered Bengal tiger has been rescued from extinction thanks to Nepal’s wildlife conservation initiatives. This is in spite of the global poaching danger faced by tiger populations. According to scientists, there are currently 235 tigers in the wild in Nepal, up from 120 in 2009.

 

3) THE INTRODUCTION OF WILDLIFE CORRIDORS HAS LESSENED HUMAN–WILDLIFE CONFLICT.

Because habitat loss and land fragmentation contribute to the reduction of biodiversity and vegetation, wildlife corridors are a practical landscaping solution.

Wildlife corridors are ecosystems that link parcels of land in order to allow wildlife to move freely between protected areas. This is true for both plants and wildlife, and it occurs as a result of dispersion or migration. The premise is that by enabling Nepalese animals to wander freely, occurrences of human–wildlife conflict would be decreased.

 

4) IN THE FACE OF THE ILLEGAL WILDLIFE TRADE, NEPAL ACHIEVED “ZERO POACHING” OF RHINOS.

The illicit wildlife trade of animal body parts is becoming more prevalent, posing a danger to current population levels. And wildlife trafficking is a multibillion-dollar industry.

Rhino horns, which are utilized in certain traditional Chinese remedies or exhibited to indicate prestige, are in high demand on the Asian black market.