Saturday, 07 December, 2019

Nepal Democracy

Caring for Dementia Patients in Nepal


The World Health Organization report on dementia revealed an alarming degree of dementia-related concerns among the resource-poor nations. In Nepal, the number of individuals suffering from dementia will probably surge above 132,000 in 20 years. Nepal has to prepare for this emerging crisis.

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Dementia accounts for 8.3 percent of the total human population of Nepal at about 26,494504. Nearly all senior citizens are in the age bracket of 60-74 years. These individuals are at a greater risk of incurring dementia (gps armbånd til demente) in the years to come. In line with the latest epidemiological research in LMICs, the rate of dementia occurrence can be deduced for Nepal. Supposing the frequency dementia rate is at 3% amongst 60 plus Nepalese seniors when compared with 5% on 65 plus population recorded by LMICs, there are around 66,000 people who are suffering some kind of dementia.

This number can double in the next 20 years. The latest status record on seniors notes the reality that a majority of Nepalese get into retirement years following a lifetime of deprivation and poverty, mediocre access to medical care and a food plan that could be insufficient in nutrients. Approximately more than 80% of seniors in Nepal are living with their children, specifically with their sons as a result of social and spiritual reasons.

Nepal is not ready for rendering the needs of people with dementia.

As dementia shows its early signs, mental health assistance takes up an essential role in detecting cognitive disability and diagnosing dementia. This is why the World Health Organization (WHO) classifies dementia as par of mental, neurological and substance abuse disorders. Facilities and other resources to meet this need are not enough in low to middle-income parts of the world.

Is there a need for diagnostic services for dementia in Nepal?

It can be asserted that the medical diagnosis of dementia will not help in cases where there is no access to evidence-based programs for ongoing treatment and support for those who have a diagnosis, along with their caregivers and families. But those who seek help in smaller health facilities and hospitals are entitled to at least information about diagnostic services and fundamental education regarding dementia.

Prevalence data on other types of neurodegenerative dementia are limited. Single case reports and dementia prevalence studies do record causes of dementia other than AD. Prion diseases, including sporadic, dominantly inherited, or transmitted cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, have also been described. The 129M susceptibility allele of the prion protein gene is found at high frequencies in Eurasian populations.

The prevalence of other kinds of neurodegenerative dementia is limited. Case reports and studies on the prevalence of dementia documented the etiology of dementia besides Alzheimer’s disease. Viral illnesses also are identified, which includes infrequent, prominent or contagious Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases.

Bottom line is that there is a need for immediate care for senior citizens in Nepal. Early medical help for those who show signs of dementia can be given early treatment to help and educate families of these patients.