Monday, 06 December, 2021

Nepal Democracy

Category: nepal education


Coronavirus is finally in check within the UK but until some weeks ago, nearly one thousand deaths per day was something that left us with no other option than to bring everything to a halt. In human history, locking someone up has had no other purpose than punishment for a criminal offense.

Minecraft

 

However, this time, we all willingly accepted it for the fear of death and to avoid wasting everyone else. In an unprecedented situation like this, one in all the vulnerable groups, among others, is usually the kids.

Weeks before the United Kingdom government officially imposed a lockdown, many kids had already stopped visiting a school. Following a nationwide school closure, the children with left with no means to satisfy their usual classmates either. This was when Pasa Puchah Guthi UK, a Nepali community organization active for the last twenty years in preserving Newah culture within the UK, stepped in.

Setting up a secure virtual space called ‘Guthi Minecraft Server’ for Nepalese kids under the age of thirteen. Coming from various regions across the United Kingdom, they need not met one another nose to nose yet. Many of them weren’t even awake to the gaming platform beforehand.

Their learning basically started with a period of knowing one another. Overarching because the aim was, the new tools meant that they had to figure really hard to urge the smallest of tasks done. Many structures were built using repetitive steps and in a time-consuming manner. However, the resulting monument was no but impressive for the primary timers. Incidentally, it absolutely was completed on May 7 which was also Buddha’s birth anniversary.

‘There are lots to be told from the Guthi Minecraft projects aside from learning how to make splash potion of weakness in-game and that I find them quite challenging. I actually remember visiting Swoyambhu once I visited Nepal with my family.’, says 8 years old Alisha Darshandhari from Stoke.

However, 7 years old Raessafrom Basingstoke encompasses a very faint memory of Swoyambhu as she was very small when she visited the location.

 

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The second project they built was the large Ben. As many of them had not even visited Swoyambhu personally, the large Ben did work as something more familiar for them to figure on. However, having seen a monument is simply not enough to recreate it in three-dimensional space was something they realized soon. One must observe the small print of its architecture, which became evident in their work by the time it absolutely was complete. By then, they’d also gained speed besides getting a bit frustrated by the necessity for manual repetitive tasks to hold out.

The third monument for them to make was quite a tough call, – the mighty Nyatapola, which is additionally Nepal’s tallest temple. Besides the concept of formal balance, in their subconscious, the monument was an ideal introduction to the unique Nepalese technique of creating visual harmony where many alternative animals were assembled in one structure. This was also the primary project during which they tried out programming techniques to avoid manual repetitions.

Alisha remembers visiting Nyatapola together with her sister but Raessa didn’t realize it before this project. On the opposite hand, Yash thinks it’s unique and of spiritual importance.

The kids are sharing the abilities in the least levels. Each of their team can sit on different compartments of this roller-coaster ride and revel in the ride that creates the sound of a choo-choo train. They’re now during a mission to expand this unique project such the tracks resemble a Srivatsa, – an infinite knot which is one amongst the eight auspicious symbols in Nepali Hinduism and Buddhism. If you begin tracking it from any point, you’ll never end anywhere; thus, letting you experience the concept of infinity and per se the endlessness of life.

After the lockdown is totally lifted and things are back to normal, the junior architects of the virtual Nepali world expect to meet one another in the flesh for the primary time. They’re already planning where they ought to meet and what games they ought to play!

 


Unesco CAPed Program Offered Training For Teachers To Improve ICT Skills And Online Presentation

As schools are shutting down due to the COVID-19 pandemic, alternative teaching methods are the only way students can continue learning. In September 2020, the UNESCO CapED program hosted training sessions in Nepal to improve teacher skills for ICT tools, presentation tools like slides by HiSlide (Powerpoint, Google Slide, and Keynote). The training session also aims to show teachers how to teach education through platforms online, radio and television offerings.

Distance Leaning | Remote Teaching Strategies

“Alternative methods for teaching and learning are very useful methods in this trying times of Corona 19 crisis. Premnarayan Bandari, a teacher at the Shuri Leh Sungga Secondary School in Gourumi, is amnong the participants. One third were women. Training completed in 5 days and were able to receive certificates after the course of training.

Use of Slides For Online Teaching Presentation

For distance learning to be truly effective, this will depend primarily on the teacher’s facilitation. It is important to address the gaps on the teacher’s ability on distance learning. This was among the challenges of teachers as identified by UNESCO consultations.

Before the training, Unesco CAPed gave technical support for the Education Human Resource Development Center (CEHRD). They have also developed guidelines for teachers and parents in order to encourage distance learning. These guidelines had been approved by the government and had the basis for training CAPed teachers.

Nepalese Participants Are Primarily Focused On Teachers

Teachers participating in the activity were selected according to different geographical locations to better represent the Nepal County. With so many teachers interested in the course training, UNESCO has expanded its program to support more teachers than originally planned. But, even after the expansion, there are still several teachers who wish to benefit from this useful course training.

“[Distance Education] is among the best ways to help facilitate learning despite of the pandemic. This is a cost-effective way to motivate and engage students. The training has given us new educational skills,” said Sham Sundal Parajuri, a teacher at Banepah Himalaya Middle School.

The feedback collected after the meeting motivated participants to learn and develop their skills and found the training to be very helpful. Participants also need to pay attention to parents and propose some ways to best support the family learning of children.

UNESCO – CAPed Program | Training For Teachers

This training is one of many activities carried out by UNESCO in response to COVID-19 in cooperation with CEHRD, Nepal Teachers’ Federation and Women Teachers’ Association through CapED. In order to continue learning, CapED helped launch the educational radio program Radio Pathshala. In cooperation with the Government of Nepal and the Nepal Regional Radio Station Association, there are currently more than 200 radio stations including 77 regions of Nepal in their programs.